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August 19, 2020

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Start Date and TimeEvent DetailsLocation

Sunday, January 24, 2021

2:00 PM - 4:00 PM
New York City Human Library/Call for Participants

Lehman College's Leonard Lief Library is partnering with the New York City Human Library [https://www.humanlibrarynyc.org/] for an online Human Library event:

  • Sunday, January 24, 2021
  • 2:00 - 4:00 PM
  • Zoom

 

What is the Human Library?
The Human Library is an organization that began in Denmark in 2000 and now has chapters [called Depots] all over the world.  In a Human Library, real people are “Books” on loan to Readers, giving Readers the opportunity to listen to their stories first-hand. 

Human Library NYC public events break down social barriers by providing a safe platform for individuals to challenge their own stereotypes and prejudices.

If you would like to register to be a 
Book or a Reader - please fill out this Interest Form:

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdM9RHKvp8BU6R8E_WGKXcLw1I5FxZGnZGlzCBiqReFUtJwLA/viewform?fbclid=IwAR1feSuLB1sQwMJZlbXden3fjHrtVor2jJ0A0t5-8RwgPV_t63URt0t9zAs

 

What is a Book in the Human Library?

Book is a volunteer who represents a stigmatized group, willing to share their story, and help challenge what is being shared and understood about their topic.

What is a Reader?

Reader is curious about the Book, can ask questions of the Book, and is respectful of the Book they are reading.

Your Story is Important.

Friday, January 29, 2021

All Day
Spring 2021 Classes Begin
First Day of class for Spring 2021 Semester
Shuster Hall

Tuesday, February 02, 2021

7:00 PM - 8:30 PM
Online Reading Group: Olio by Tyehimba Jess

Throughout Black History Month, One Book One Bronx, in collaboration with the Leonard Lief Library at Lehman College, will host a series of eclectic programs and reading groups as part of the yearlong initiative Lift Every Voice: Why African American Poetry Matters. Sponsored by the Library of America and The Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Lift Every Voice seeks to engage participants in a multifaceted exploration of African American poetry. 

Join us on Tuesdays in February for a three-part discussion of
Olio by Tyehimba Jess, winner of the 2017 Pulitzer Prize. Part fact, part fiction, the book weaves sonnet, song, and narrative to examine the lives of mostly unrecorded African-American performers directly before and after the Civil War up to World War I.

Click here to register

Start Date and TimeEvent DetailsLocation

Wednesday, August 19, 2020

All Day
8:00 AM - 6:00 PM
10:00 AM - 4:00 PM
11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Reading with Margot Mifflin: Looking for Miss America: A Pageant’s 100-Year Quest to Define Womanhood

Looking for Miss America is the first feminist history of the Miss America pageant. From its start in 1921 as an Atlantic City tourist draw to its current incarnation as a scholarship competition, the pageant has indexed women’s status during periods of social change–the post-suffrage 1920s, the Eisenhower 1950s, the #MeToo era. This ever-changing institution has been shaped by war, evangelism, the rise of television and reality TV, and, significantly, by contestants who confounded expectations.

Spotlighting individuals, from Yolande Betbeze, whose refusal to pose in swimsuits led an angry sponsor to launch the rival Miss USA contest, to the first black winner, Vanessa Williams, who received death threats and was protected by sharpshooters in her hometown parade, Mifflin shows how women made hard bargains even as they used the pageant for economic advancement. The pageant’s history includes, crucially, those it excluded; the notorious Rule Seven, which required contestants to be “of the white race,” was retired in the 1950s, but no women of color were crowned until the 1980s. Written in deeply researched, fast-paced chapters that unpack each decade of the competition,  Looking for Miss America examines the heady blend of capitalism, patriotism, class anxiety, and cultural mythology that has fueled this American ritual.

Leonard Lief Library
12:30 PM - 6:30 PM

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